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The Best and Worst of Super Bowl Advertising

5 Feb

During the first 49 Super Bowls, there have been a lot of TV commercials presented, and billions of dollars spent on them. So, which of these commercials are considered the best and which the worst?

Before reading the experts’ choices, state what is your all-time favorite Super Bowl TV commercial and what is your least favorite. Why?
 

According to Judann Pollack, writing for Ad Age, these are the top 10 Super Bowl TV ads from games 1-49. Click the ad title to see it at YouTube; and click here to learn why these ads were chosen as the best:

  1. Apple, “1984.”
  2. Monster.com, “When I Grow Up.”
  3. Budweiser, “Respect.” (9/11 Tribute!)
  4. Coca-Cola, “Hilltop.”
  5. EDS, “Cat Herding.”
  6. Coca-Cola, “Mean Joe Greene.”
  7. Nike, “Hare Jordan.”
  8. Volkswagen, “The Force.”
  9. Ram Trucks, “Farmer.”
  10. Budweiser, “Whassup!?”

 

According to Kimberly Potts, reporting for Yahoo! TV, these are the worst Super Bowl TV ads from games 1-49. Click the ad title to see it at YouTube; and click here to learn why these ads were chosen as the worst:

  1. Groupon, “Save the Money – Tibet”
  2. GM, “Robot Commercial”
  3. SalesGenie.com, “Pandas”
  4. Go Daddy, “Body Paint: Danica Patrick & Jillian Michaels”
  5. Go Daddy, “Exposure: Danica Patrick”
  6. Miller, “Evil Beavers vs. Miller Lite”
  7. Pepsi, “King’s Court with Elton John”
  8. Go Daddy, “Perfect Match with Bar Refaeli”
  9. Teleflora, “Adriana Lima”
  10. Bridgestone Tires, Alice Cooper & Richard Simmons”

 

More Than 25% of Super Bowl Advertisers Will Be Newbies

29 Jan

Now, that we (about 120 million U.S. viewers) are about 10 days from Super Bowl 50, the advertising picture is becoming clearer. And after all, this is the “Super Bowl” of advertising with 30-second commercials going for $5 million or so (just for air time).

What is especially interesting about the 50th anniversary Super Bowl is how many companies will be advertising for the first time. As reported by Jeanine Poggi for Advertising Age:

“The usual advertising stalwarts will certainly be on hand for Super Bowl 50, but so will plenty of newbies. Longtime advertisers like Budweiser and Coca-Cola will share the stage with brands like Amazon, Colgate, and Marmot, which are all making their Super Bowl debuts. Overwhelmingly, the marketers making their Super Bowl debuts have one goal in mind — to build brand awareness.”

“There are currently 13 confirmed marketers that will air commercials in the big game for the first time, up from 10 in 2015. Already, that figure would make Super Bowl 50 the third most popular game for new advertisers since such stats began being tracked. There were 19 first-timers in 2000 and 14 in 1999, according to Kantar Media, which has tracked the Super Bowl since 1988.”

Click the image to see the 13 newbies.


 
And here’s a YouTube video for the ad of one newcomer.
 

 

Companies Doing Best on Instragram

28 Jan

Instagram is rapidly gaining in popularity. In 2012, about 13 percent of U.S. adults were utilizing Instagram. Today, about 30 percent are using Instagram (extrapolated from Pew Center data).

So, given the growing popularity of Instagram, more companies are using the site for marketing purposes. Who is doing best?

Consider this list of best business users of Instagram from HubSpot’s Lindsay Koliwich. We are citing HubSpot’s top five. To see its full list of 16 firms, click here:

  1. WeWork — “It provides shared office spaces in cities and countries all over the globe — so it only makes sense that they should post a lot of photos showcasing their beautiful office spaces.”
  2. National Geographic — It “posts photos from contributors traveling anywhere from large cities to the Arctic to small African villages. It’s built an enormous following — 42.4 million followers as of this posting — and established themselves as one of the very top Instagram brands in the world.”
  3. Coca-Cola Argentina — “Coca-Cola’s social media presence is impressive across all the social platforms. friendship, and sports. The brand’s personality comes directly from this: ‘It’s happy, playful, friendly, refreshing, and all about sharing and having a good time.’ Take a look at how Coca-Cola Argentina uses Instagram to celebrate that personality and that target audience.”
  4. Frooti — “Here’s another brand that uses Instagram to showcase a distinctive personality. Frooti, the largest-selling fruit drink brand in India, posts images that are so unique and so consistent that anyone else posting similar content might be seen as a copycat.”
  5. Frank Bod — “This Australian body and skin care brand has one of the best presences on Instagram. Their products are coffee-based, so many of their photos include models covered in their product, which basically looks like coffee grounds. This is their signature play on Instagram, and we love how they make fun of themselves with photos.”

 

 

Amazon Smile :-)

25 Jan

This NOT a sale pitch. If you already shop at Amazon, there is now an easy way to give to charity. Amazon Smile is a rather new application that costs nothing to join or use when shopping. Through Amazon Smile, a 1/2% donation is made to the charity you choose when you shop. You can type in any charity you want. [Just type in the name of the charity instead of selecting one of the recommended ones.] :-)

To learn more about Amazon Smile, click here. To sign up for Amazon Smile, click here.

Note: Amazon Smile works if you are a Prime member too at no cost to you.

 

Eligible charities may also sign up to participate in Amazon Smile. Click here to get more information.

 

Are YOU Ready for the New World of APIs?

5 Jan

Do you know what an API is and how it is/will be transforming technology? To learn about APIs, read on. :-)

According to software giant CA Technologies:

“Think about what you can do today that you could not 15 years ago. Hail a ride or start your car from a smartphone. Find a restaurant from your tablet. Monitor your fitness from a device on your wrist. Check availability of a product and order it from the nearest store anytime, anywhere. Or what businesses are doing that they could not in 2000. Expose petabytes of data from legacy systems. Build new applications without reinventing the wheel. Share information instantly with customers, suppliers and partners. Develop. Monetize. In record time.”

“There’s something at work behind the scenes that’s powering the new economy, the App Economy. It’s greasing the exchange of information, a modern-day Rosetta Stone. It’s called the Application Programming Interface.”

 

For an interactive, informative, and entertaining view of APIs, click on the image and scroll down CA Technologies‘ animated chart. Then, take a look at the video below the image.

 

APIs


 

The Best of Evans on Marketing in 2015

4 Jan

Here the ten most-viewed posts made in 2015 by Evans on Marketing. Please take a look. Thanks.

  1. See How Well You Can Do on This Entertaining Marketing Quiz
  2. For What Career Are You Best Suited?
  3. Be a Smart Customer: 2015 Holiday Shopping Tips
  4. Body Language Errors to Avoid During Interviews
  5. What Are the Toughest Languages to Translate?
  6. Doing Better with Google Analytics: An Infographic
  7. Looking to Generate Passion? Consider Using the Color Red
  8. Does Rebranding Always Work?
  9. Personalizing Marketing
  10. Food Brands Capitalizing on Instagram

If you like these posts, PLEASE sign up to follow us at Evans on Marketing. Thanks.
 

Updating Our Most Popular Post EVER

1 Jan

Online Shopping Behavior by Gender and Age has been our most popular post since we started this blog in 2012. It has been viewed thousands of time. Thank you!

As a result, with the start of 2016, we are updating this post with EIGHT new sources of information (all published in 2015) on online shopping and gender and age, in alphabetical order. Click on any of the links to read more from each source.

E-commerce Chart: Online shopping Behaviors of Millennials Versus Baby Boomers by Daniel Burstein and Liva LaMontagne for Marketing Sherpa:

“This month (July 2015) , Neustar released a survey it conducted with the E-tailing group on 1,020 shoppers — 50% male, 50% female who spent at least $250 online, purchased online at least four times annually and owned smartphones. Their research shows that the biggest differences between millennials and baby boomers.”

E-commerce Demographic Report: In a Reversal, Women Are Now Dominating Mobile Shopping by Cooper Smith for Business Insider with data from Business Intelligence:

“Of U.S. consumers who say they’ve completed a purchase on a mobile device in the last month, 66.5% are women and 33.5% are men. Compare that to 2013, when a greater share of men than women completed purchases on mobile. Women are more actively researching products and retailers on mobile devices than men. Women are also more likely than men are to look up store locations on mobile devices.Women are more likely to be influenced by coupons and marketing campaigns compared to men. 27% of women and 20% of men say coupons influence their purchasing decisions, according to a study published by the  National Retail Federation.”

Gen X and Baby Boomers Present a Huge Opportunity for Online Retailers by Cooper Smith for Business Insider:

“The conventional wisdom is that teens and millennials drive E-commerce trends. In actuality, a disproportionate share of middle-aged consumers are shopping online. 23% of online shoppers fall between the ages of 35 and 44, while only 18% of the US population is that age. 24% of online shoppers are between the ages of 45 to 54, even though less than 20% of the U.S. population falls between those ages.”

How Gender, Age, and Left-Handedness Affect E-Commerce Behavior by Ayaz Nanji  for Marketing Profs::

According to a French study of 4,000 consumers: “Women are more active than men on E-commerce Web sites,women click 30% more on Web sites than men; women view 12% more pages; women hesitate 10% less before clicking on a page element; and women purchase 7% faster than men.”

“Younger (18-34 years old) and older (45-64 years old) consumers generally behave similarly on E-commerce sites, though there are some differences. Older consumers view 4% fewer pages; and older consumers’ hesitation time is 30% longer.”

How Your Buying Behavior Can Predict Your Gender by Krystina Gustafson for CNBC:

“When [online] subscription beauty service Birchbox started selling men’s sample boxes three years ago, the company’s founders quickly learned there are certain shopping habits that distinguish men from women. Whereas, females would test samples that the company sent them in the mail — sometimes purchasing a full-size version of an item they really liked — men would immediately snatch up six to a dozen versions of the same thing. “Birchbox was so unaccustomed to such buying behavior that its Web site started to code the orders as fraudulent!! ‘[Men] were buying something that they liked, and they weren’t just buying one of it,’ said Katia Beauchamp, one of Birchbox’s co-founders. ‘The guys in our office were like, ‘No, no, no, that’s how we buy soap.'”

“Though Birchbox’s case study may err on the extreme, it’s just one of a flurry of ways in which men approach shopping differently than women. For a more basic understanding, next time you’re at the mall, take a quick scan of your fellow shoppers.”

Gender Influence on Consumer Buying Behaviour by Sovit Khurana is available on Slideshare.

Online Shopping Behavior of Consumers by Preeti Singh1 and Radha Kashyap2 (a study of 200 experienced online shoppers) for International Journal of Innovative Research in Science, Engineering and Technology:

“The study results indicate that females had positive attitudes to purchase online apparel as compared to males. Further results shows that working females had more inclined towards online shopping as compared to working males. The results also show that respondents of the younger age group between 20-30 years, both males and females, purchased apparel online as compare to males and females of 30-40 years, 40-50 years, and 50 & above. The study further indicates that higher-income groups of females were more inclined towards frequent online purchases as compared to male counterparts.”

Portrait of an Online Shopper: Understanding and Predicting Consumer Behavior by Farshad Kooti, Kristina Lerman, Luca Maria Aiello, Mihajlo Grbovic, Nemanja Djuric, and Vladan Radosavljevic for ACM:

“We find that a higher fraction of women make online purchases compared to men; but men make slightly more purchases per person. Men and women also purchase different types of products online. Even though the ranking of the top products is the same for men and women, each product accounts for different fraction of all purchases within the same gender. With respect to the age, spending ability increases as people get older, peaking among the population between ages 30 to 50 and declining afterwards. The same pattern holds for number of purchases made, average item price, and total money spent.”

 

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