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2014 Customer Champions

9 Dec

1to1 Media recently released its 2014 Customer Champions report. This is how it defines customer champion:

“Behind every successful enterprise-wide customer strategy is an individual who tirelessly evangelizes the customer cause, who reminds employees that customers are the business, who understands how to transform loyalty into profit, and whose efforts both command attention and garner real results. I am a Customer Champion.”

“Since its inception in 2004, the 1to1 Media Customer Champions has grown into a one-of-a-kind awards program that honors and spotlights individuals responsible for game-changing customer-focused strategies — a truly unique event that honors the leaders who create innovative change in their organizations. The awards program now includes a group of more than 130 distinguished leaders representing household name brands. From sweeping voice-of-the-customer initiatives and data analysis strategies to employee engagement and omnichannel initiatives, this year’s 12 winners are the creative disruptors in their firm who play a critical role in advancing their organizations’ customer strategies.”

These are the 2014 winners:

  • Annamarie Bermundo, AVP, CRM and digital platform development at L’Oreal Paris USA, “offers customers digital, interactive platforms that enable each individual to experience the brand before completing the sale, improving both loyalty and trust.”
  • Anna DiGregorio, Marketing Director at Marketplace Philadelphia Management, “implemented training programs and gamification features to streamline services at Philadelphia International Airport.”
  • Kyle Groff, JetBlue’s manager of customer insights, “harnesses customer insights to improve travelers’ experiences.”
  • Deepak Khandelwal, Google’s vice-president of global customer experience, “champions convenience and positive experiences for a global customer base.”
  • Mike Lester, president of The Melting Pot, “inspires employees to pursue the ‘Perfect Night Out’ standard by serving customers on an individualized level in any capacity possible.”
  •  Jim McCann, 1-800-Flowers.com’s CEO, “commits to conversations with satisfied and dissatisfied customers.”
  • Eric McKirdy, manager, global customer care and the face of Ask.com’s customer service team, “is leading the company’s efforts to rebuild its customer service strategy.”
  • Tom Mueller, ADP’s vice-president of client experience, “makes data meaningful by mapping the customer’s journey.”
  • Glenn Schleicher, Cisco’s director of the Smart Web Technology Group, “makes sure the company’s self-service technologies are designed to meet customers’ needs and expectations.”
  • Gregg Tilston, global social media leader at Flight Centre Travel Group, “empowers employees with the social playbook and creative freedom necessary to exceed consumer expectations and cultivate true fans.”
  • Gavin Woody, vice-president, operations at A Place for Mom, “quantifies the customer experience by providing agents with the tools and knowledge required for quality customer service.”
  • John Wompey, vice-president of operations at Foot Locker, “uses voice of the customer data to uncover truths that drive companywide innovation and employee success.”

Click the image to access 1to1 Media’s full report, with profiles of each winner.

 

 

Don’t Have Bad Content on Social Media

5 Dec

Of course, not all social media content is great — or even good. But some B-to-C and B-2-B companies write especially weak social media content.

As Nicole Karlis reports for the Scripted blog:

“Many marketers are turning to content marketing to increase brand awareness, search rankings, boost leads and more — but there’s a dark side that many neglect to talk about. As content marketing continues to increase in popularity in every industry, more marketers are focusing on the value it can bring to the table. It’s true, content marketing is a great way to reach a new audience, generate brand awareness, educate consumers and more — but it also can be very detrimental to a marketing strategy, especially if it isn’t done the right way.”

“In the following infographic, we decided to focus on the part of content marketing that marketers are often hesitant to talk about: the dark side. Scroll through below to learn more about the dark side of content marketing, in addition to advice on how to avoid becoming one of these scary statistics.”

[Note: Scroll to the bottom of this post for some resources on content marketing.]

 

Resources from Nicole Karlis:

 

Ad Imagery Is Sometimes “Borrowed”

19 Nov

A lot of popular advertisements are based on themes or elements that are appropriated from other work, such as movies, TV shows, etc. Sometimes, this appropriation is done really well; other times, it is not.

According to Allison McCartney, writing for Visual.ly:

“Appropriation, or the act of re-using and re-purposing pre-existing imagery, has long been an effective communication tool. Artists have appropriated imagery for decades to comment on pop culture, but advertisers and marketers also use appropriated imagery to make a connection with audiences. However, when not done correctly, ‘appropriation’ can merely become a ripoff of someone else’s work. It’s important to know where to draw the line.”

“Appropriated imagery can be a cultural touchstone when the images are popular enough to be known by a broad swath of the audience. Images become a language when enough people recognize them and understand their meaning. They can be a sort of shorthand that conveys messages, creates tone, sparks memories, and creates connections between ideas. The 2011 Volkswagen Super Bowl commercial, for example, was a fantastic example of appropriation. By using Star Wars imagery and sound to tell a story throughout the commercial, the creators of this ad maximized the benefits of appropriation.”

Read more from McCartney to see several bad examples of appropriation.

 

 

Profiling the Cyber Criminal and Fighting Back

15 Nov

Learn more about global cyber criminals. Are YOU prepared?

Check out the infographic from Jumio, which provides a close look at international cyber fraud as well as tips for consumers on how to protect themselves.
 

 

Looking for Something to Do at Lunch? Here’s an Infographic to Give You at Least One Good Chuckle

10 Nov

In our lives and at work, we are often under a lot of pressure and feel stressed. How can we relieve these feelings — at least for a little while?

Try looking at this clever infographic from the UK’s Chair Office:

“Lunch breaks are the savior of the working day. For one wonderful hour every day, we can stop thinking about deadlines and targets, and use the time instead to grab a bite to eat, read some news, and watch funny videos about cats on YouTube (guilty!). So, with that in mind, we’re encouraging  you to make the most of your lunch break this week – and what better way to do that then by breaking a world record?”

This infographic is LOL for me. How about you? :-)
 

 

Brand Sacrifice? Yes. Consumer Sacrifice? Not Really.

9 Nov

As consumers, we are becoming more demanding of our brands. We often don’t to trade features or quality for a low price. We want it all — including a greater sense of corporate responsibility.

Here’s a provocative observation from Trendwatching.com:

“One powerful question for brands to answer in 2015: what are you prepared to SACRIFICE? Consumers don’t want to make the world a better place.They want brands to do that for them ;)”

“Okay, that’s a simplification of a complex issue. But when it comes to making the world a better place, many consumers are setting a more stringent standard for brands than they are for themselves. And let’s face it, given decades of unethical operations, rampant pollution, disinformation, and more, brands deserve it. After all, many brands have worked extremely hard to create many of the behaviors and lifestyle choices that well-meaning consumers are now finding so hard to change. In a global survey of 30,000 consumers, 72% of people said that business is failing to take care of the planet and society as a whole. (Accenture & Havas Media, June 2014)”

“The easiest and most desirable way for consumers to assuage (or obliterate!) their guilt? For brands to make visible, meaningful, and constructive SACRIFICES: of products, processes, attention, and opportunities.”

Click the image to read more —  and to see what “sacrifices” companies such as CVS, Tesco, Subway, Intel, and others are making.
 

 

Yes, There ARE Still Real Heroes!

3 Nov

We can all be responsible members of society and give back to the community.

This is NOT a post about a major team sport or about a famous athlete or a famous celebrity or a famous business leader. It is also NOT about the misdeeds going on in the world. Rather, it is about how true heroes can help to bring us together as a society. This post is about Pete Fretas and the ALS “Ice Bucket Challenge” and cancer victim Lauren Hill’s quest to play college basketball.

For several months, we’ve been following the uplifting story of the “Ice Bucket Challenge.” Do you know the origin of the challenge? It’s sports-related: Pete Frates, a Bostonian who was diagnosed with ALS in March 2012, is credited with initiating the challenge. Pete was a baseball player and team captain at Boston college, where he graduated in 2007. He then played baseball in Germany, where he also coached. His story was featured on ESPN.
 

 
To date, donations made to the ALS Association as a result of the challenge have totaled $22 million. And if you type in “ice bucket challenge” at YouTube, you will find more than 18 million entries. The Simpsons’ entry alone has generated 24 million views.
 

 
 
Lauren Hill has inoperable brain cancer. As reported by Alyssa Roenigk for ESPN:

“Hill is that woman you’ve heard about somewhere, maybe on ESPN, maybe on Facebook, maybe in the newspaper, perhaps on early morning TV. She’s the college freshman basketball player who was diagnosed with brain cancer her senior year of high school, after deciding to attend Division III Mount St. Joseph University in Cincinnati. She’s the girl whose parents, after her tumor spread and she was given only a few months to live, worked with her college coach, the opposing team’s coach, and the NCAA to move her team’s opening game up by two weeks in the hopes that she will still be strong enough to suit up for one collegiate game. The 19-year-old has been giving interviews and fighting publicly in the hopes of bringing attention to the rare form of brain cancer from which she will die. And she’s the girl whose story garnered so much attention that the site of Mount St. Joe’s Sunday game against Hiram College was moved to Xavier University’s Cintas Center, and the 10,000-seat arena sold out within a day.”

“But Hill is more than that freshman you heard about somewhere. She’s also a daughter to Lisa and Brent, and a big sister to Erin, 14, and Nathan, 17. She’s a soccer fan, has a creative eye, and loves music, all types of music, just not screamo. She’s a fan of the Harlem Globetrotters, was painfully shy before her diagnosis, and is a wiz with Photoshop. She likes to shoot videos and edit them for her family, and you know that image that’s been going around online, the one of Lauren standing with her hands on her hips in her high school uniform, the one that was shot from behind and adorns #1More4Lauren images on Twitter? She designed that herself. ‘I’m really proud of that,’ Hill said.

Yesterday, Lauren got to play. And she helped to raise more than $40,000 for The Cure Starts Now Foundation; and there is a foundation URL dedicated to Lauren.
 

 

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