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An Interview with Fashion Legend Diane Von Furstenberg

17 Jul

Diane Von Furstenberg has been a prominent, trend-setting fashion designer for decades. Take a look at the Web site of her company to see what she’s doing now.

Here’s a brief bio of Von Furstenberg by Liz Welch of Inc.:

“Designer Diane von Furstenberg was 27 when she made the first wrap dress in 1974. The iconic design landed her on the cover of Newsweek — and millions of women snapped up her dresses. But when demand faded, von Furstenberg ended up selling most of her licenses to avoid bankruptcy. In 1997, von Furstenberg relaunched her company, which now has annual sales of more than $200 million. The wrap dress, too, made a comeback, and recently celebrated its 40th anniversary with ‘The Journey of the Dress’ exhibition, which traveled the globe. And, as the 68-year-old designer recently shared with Inc. contributing editor Liz Welch, she is focused on building a company to outlast any fad.”

Click Von Furstenberg’s photo to read her recent interview with Liz Welch for Inc.
 

 

Nielsen’s 2014 Breakthrough Award Winners

14 Jul

Research giant Nielsen annually examines thousands of new product introductions.

As part of its analysis, Nielsen has identified its 2014 U.S. Breakthrough Innovation Winners: “These diverse new products carry the common thread of finding and filling unmet consumer needs while demonstrating that with significant effort, game-changing innovation is possible in any category and by all types of companies.” The products are all commonly found in the supermarket.

The winning products were all introduced in 2012. We have inserted direct links to these products:

 

Companies That Have Changed the World

9 Jul

Many companies have had a major impact on business practices and our lives. And a lot of these companies have endured for a century or more.

Recently, Fortune published a list of 27 companies that have changed the world over the last century-plus.

Sorry, Apple fans — but Apple ranks only 16th on the list!

Click the image to see the full list. :-)
 

 

Who Are the Best at Customer Relationship Management (CRM)?

8 Jul

For the tenth year, a major award for the best firms in  CRM has been given by 1to1Media, this time in conjunction with Gartner.

Click here to read a summary about the 2014 Gartner &1to1 Media CRM Excellence awards.

And click the image to read the full report.
 

 

How Should You Respond to Negative Social Media Comments?

30 Jun

One of the main social media challenges for all companies is how to respond to negative comments. It is imperative that negative comments be tracked and understood.

In general, there are three options for dealing with negative social media comments: (1) ignore the comments; (2) point out why the comments are wrong; and (3) constructively reply to the comments. Although many firms choose option (1) or (2), it is more appropriate to choose option (3).

As High Powered SEO puts it:

“You have spent hours preparing an amazing post or share something worth a meaningful discussion. Then, you notice that a couple of people are saying the complete opposite from what you have shared. This is normally fine except they express their opinions in a way that may rub you the wrong way. How do you handle this type of situation? Do you lash out in order to get your point across, not respond at all, delete the comment, or just flat-out ignore it?”

“There are plenty of ways you can handle this type of situation, but if you don’t handle it the right way you could be doing much more harm than good. It is best to handle this situation tactfully.”

Check out the infographic of tips from High Powered SEO.
 
RESPOND TO NEGATIVE COMMENTS ON SOCIAL MEDIA AND BLOG POSTS  INFOGRAPHIC
 

Evans on Marketing’s 20 Most Popular Posts

23 Jun

Since this blog began in 2012, several of the 900 posts have been especially popular among readers. For those who have missed any of the 20 most popular posts, here they are:

  1. Best Business Decisions Ever?
  2. Online Shopping Behavior by Gender and Age
  3. Do You Regularly Check Yourself Out at Google?
  4. A Job Skills Infographic
  5. Is It OK to Leave a Job Off Your Resume?
  6. The Volkswagen Jetta Promotes Safety
  7. Apple and Planned Obsolescence: Is This Good Or Bad?
  8. New Balance Athletic Shoes: Made in the USA — But for How Long?
  9. Great Privacy Tip: How to Go Incognito on Google Chrome
  10. The Value of Infographics
  11. Are You Trying NOT to Get A Job?
  12. Ten Tips to Help You Get a Job Interview
  13. Is Marketing a Good Career Choice?
  14. Where Consumers Will Pay More for Products from Socially-Conscious Companies
  15. 15 Traits of Superior Employees
  16. The Top Social Media Sites in China: An Infographic
  17. Do YOU Provide Too Much Online Information About Yourself?
  18. Is Banning Facebook at Work a Good Or Bad Idea?
  19. Questions NOT to Ask During a Job Interview
  20. Is Sharing One’s Salary Data with Co-Workers OK?

 

Is Everything You Know About ROI Wrong?

12 Jun

For most companies, maximizing their return on investment (ROI) is a key goal that drives their strategies. But are they using and measuring ROI properly? Sometimes, ROI is not so easy to determine.

With this in mind, consider the slideshow “How to Determine the ROI of Anything” by Gary Vaynerchuk, working at VaynerMedia: “What’s the ROI of a piano? What’s the ROI of a YouTube channel? What’s the ROI of anything!? After you read this deck you’ll be able to answer all these questions easily.”

 

 

An Interesting New Concept: “Sympathetic Pricing”

11 Jun

As we have written several times before, the marketing dictionary seems to be exploding. The new term for today is sympathetic pricing.

According to Trendwatching.com, sympathetic pricing is driven by this phenomenon:

“Get ready for a wave of imaginative discounts that relieve lifestyle pain points, offer a helping hand in difficult times, or support a shared value.”

However, Trendwatching.com adds that:

“When brands claim to care about people and their everyday challenges, or about the shared problems we all face – sustainability, social responsibility, and more – most consumers think they’re just saying that. Sure, that’s a simple characterization of a complex issue, and it doesn’t apply to all consumers and every brand.”

“But countless surveys, reports, and statistics all point in the same direction: when it comes to truly caring about consumers, owning a higher purpose and generally being a more HUMAN BRAND, most people think that most brands still don’t get it.”

Click the image to read a LOT more about sympathetic pricingfrom the seller’s and the buyer’s perspectives.
 


 

Like It Or Not: Native Advertising Is Here to Stay

30 May

Native advertising is a relatively new practice that is rather controversial. It is also booming!!!!! On the one hand, beleaguered publishers — print and online — are able to generate more ad dollars. On the other hand, consumers may not recognize that material that looks like a regular story is really a disguised ad.

With regard to online native advertising, HubShout puts it this way:

“Native advertising has been proven to be a solid strategy for online companies looking for a new way to distribute their content. It’s being adopted by the largest of publishers, and becoming a largely lucrative and successful method of advertising, making it the biggest internet marketing trend this year. As your eye flows down the Web page, you move from ‘native content’ into something that has been sponsored with less distinction.  There’s a less abrupt transition, and that’s, hence the name, native advertising.”

HubSpot has published a FREE book — What is Native Advertising and How Does It Impact Consumers? — that is available for download.

It has also produced the statistical infographic on native advertising shown below.
 

 

Aggravated by Airline Pricing?

29 May

The complexities and variability of airfares can be disconcerting even to the most patient people. Two recent articles appearing in the Wall Street Journal illustrate the situation. The second article referenced in this post shows how dire matters are to many fliers — the government is proposing a new disclosure rule.
 
First, Scott McCartney reported about the “Airfare Riddle: Same Flight, Different Prices”:

“The flight is the same. Even the seat is the same. So why is the airline charging two different — sometimes very different — prices? American Airlines and US Airways, which merged late last year, are selling seats on each other’s airplanes. But they are pricing tickets separately, and will continue to do so for the next 18 to 24 months. American flights have one price in American’s reservation system and sometimes a different price in US Airways’ reservation system. Same for flights on US Airways airplanes: Check both AA.com and USAirways.com and you’re likely to see different prices.”

“The savings opportunity for savvy travelers can sometimes be large. Earlier this week, a one-way ticket on American’s Flight 1054 from Boston to Dallas-Fort Worth was $656 on American’s website, but only $346 on USAirways.com. A Phoenix-Seattle round trip on US Airways flights for travel June 13 to 20 was $359 on US Airways’ Web site, but only $298 on AA.com.”

Within McCartney’s article was an interesting chart. Click the image for a larger version.

Illustrations by Jean Tuttle

 
Second, Jack Nicas wrote about “U.S. Government Proposes Requiring Airlines to Disclose More Fees”:

“The U.S. Transportation Department’s proposed new rule would enable customers to see airline fees for the first two checked bags, a carry-on bag, and a seat reservation alongside airfares when they browse for tickets. The requirement is largely aimed at improving fliers’ ability to compare prices between carriers on travel Web sites like Kayak and Expedia. ‘The current system does not give consumers accurate pricing and does not allow comparative shopping,’ said Charlie Leocha, head of the Consumer Travel Alliance, a flier-advocacy group. ‘This new system will… So it is a dramatic change.’”

Within Nicas’ article was another interesting chart. Click the image for a larger version.


 

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