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Free Resources from Trendwatching.com

17 Jul

Trendwatching.com is an excellent source of information about current and emerging trends around the globe:

“Established in 2002, we help forward-thinking business professionals in 180+ countries understand the new consumer and subsequently uncover compelling, profitable innovation opportunities. We rely on professionals in London, New York, São Paulo, Singapore and Lagos and on our network of spotters in more than 90+ countries worldwide.”

At its Web site, Trendwatching.com makes available a number of free resources. Here are some recent examples:

 

 

Mary Pacifico-Valley: A Great Career in Auto Marketing

15 Jul

Mary Pacifico-Valley is the owner of Denver-based Rickenbaugh Automotive Group. Pacifico-Valley worked her way up the ranks to her present position, and her company is hugely successful:

“Rickenbaugh Cadillac Volvo in Denver, CO and Infiniti in Dacono treats the needs of each individual customer with paramount concern. We know that you have high expectations, and as a car dealer we enjoy the challenge of meeting and exceeding those standards each and every time. Allow us to demonstrate our commitment to excellence! Our experienced sales staff is eager to share its knowledge and enthusiasm with you. We encourage you to browse our online inventory, schedule a test drive and investigate financing options. You can also request more information about a vehicle using our online form.”

 
Here is a motivating video on Pacifico-Valley’s career and her business philosophy.

 

The 2015 Gartner & 1to1 Media Customer Experience Excellence Award Winners

9 Jul

Which companies are role models with regard to customer experience excellence? Let’s turn to the 2015 Gartner and 1to1 Media Customer Awards competition:

“Since 2004, Gartner and 1to1 Media have honored these leading customer-centric companies for their outstanding business performance and exceptional results through the Gartner & 1to1 Media Customer Experience Excellence Awards. For the 2015 program, 1to1 Media and Gartner have created four new categories that aim to highlight outstanding enterprise-wide customer experience achievement that resulted in increased revenue, reduced cost, and greater profitability.”

 

Ad Campaigns That Inspire

6 Jul

Great ads can inspire us and elevate the image of an organization and its brands. Unfortunately, in this era of heavy advertising clutter, “inspiring” ads are too rare. :-)

So, let’s look at several inspiring ads, as presented by Jami Oetting for the HubSpot Blog:

“A great idea can inspire. But it can also make you jealous of its simplicity, humor, emotion, and elegance. And no other event in the marketing and advertising industry brings so many jealousy-inducing ideas together as the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. The event recently wrapped at the end of June and this year’s top winners — the Grand Prix recipients — provide us with another list of interesting and inspiring work.”

 
Here are inspiring ads in five different categories. [Click here to see 21 Cannes-winning ads.]
 
 
Film: “A new Leica ‘100’ advertisement, relating to the Leica 100 year centennial and celebrating the opening of the Leica Gallery in Sao Paulo, Brazil. It recreates 35 historical Leica photos.”


 
 
Cyber: Gisele Bündchen – I WILL WHAT I WANT.” “Gisele knows what it means to live under the microscope, amongst the noise of contradicting opinions. But will beats noise.


 
 
Radio: To mark the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, Soundcloud and Grey Berlin created an acoustic reconstruction of the Berlin Wall.


 
 
Product Design: Geometry Global created a no-tech, simple product to help the people of Cambodia prevent iron deficiency. The fish-shaped piece of iron, which symbolized hope and good luck in the community, is cooked in the person’s meal for 10 minutes and can contribute 75% of a person’s daily required iron intake.”


 
 
Media: Y&R Istanbul created an app for Vodafone that allowed women in a domestic abuse situation to seek help from three pre-selected friend. But the app couldn’t be mass marketed, so it was promoted within makeup tutorials, on clothing tags, and when the person copied and pasted an offer code.”


 

Evans on Marketing’s Most Popular Posts for the First Half of 2015

3 Jul

Thank you for reading our evansonmarketing.com posts. :-)

Here are the most popular 12 posts thus far in 2015 (January 1-June 30). Take a look if you missed any of them:

  1. See How Well You Can Do on This Entertaining Marketing Quiz (Because this quiz is no longer available, here is another interesting one for you: 5 Things You Thought You Knew About Interactive Content)
  2. What Job Skills Will Be Most Important in 2020?
  3. Body Language Errors to Avoid During Interviews
  4. What Are the Toughest Languages to Translate?
  5. Looking to Generate Passion? Consider Using the Color Red
  6. Social Marketing Tips
  7. Do YOU Think Before You Tweet?
  8. Personalizing Marketing
  9. Ten Marketing-Oriented Business Trends to Consider: A Slideshow
  10. Does Rebranding Always Work?
  11. Video and Social Media Are Big in the Mobile Era
  12. Pay More Attention to Loyal Customers!

 

 

Marketing and Sales: Better Cooperation Needed

29 Jun

Even though, a company’s sales personnel are typically viewed as part of the marketing function, there are also differences of opinion and sometimes conflicts between marketing and sales. Instead, mutual respect and cooperation need to rule the day!

As Hadar Duek observes for HubSpot:

“In my job, I chat with marketers very often about what problems they’re facing. One of the most common issues I hear about is lead flow — a marketing department generates hundreds of leads per month, but many of them aren’t closing. Nobody knows where to turn. Sales points fingers at marketing. Marketing points fingers at sales. They both shrug, unsure of how to proceed. To get the partnership running effectively again, there are three things I recommend marketers start doing with their sales team.”

1) “Provide sales training on how inbound leads are different. Many sales reps are trained to aggressively go after leads who will close ASAP — and ignore the ones who won’t. When I was in sales, I did the same thing. If a prospect wasn’t ready to send in a purchase order in the next week, I was onto the next lead. With limited time and an endless universe of opportunities, I had to prioritize. This mentality needs to shift when your company is generating inbound leads. Just because someone became a lead by downloading an E-book doesn’t mean they are ready to buy something immediately. On the other hand, they may very well be a great fit for your company down the line.”

2) “Develop a feedback loop between marketing and sales. How often have you seen leads go sales, receive follow-up, and then fall into a black hole? In my work with HubSpot customers, I see it all the time. This is a huge missed opportunity. To prevent this lack of communication, set up a way for sales to pass leads back into the nurturing funnel based on what they learned in the initial qualifying conversation. They like pink? Put them into the all-pink text E-mail nurturing campaign. They like chocolate sandwiches? Put them into the E-mail nurturing campaigns with lots of chocolate sandwiches.”

3) Set up regular meetings between marketing and sales. Some marketers pass all leads directly to their sales team and others only pass over the ones that meet criteria they determine as ‘sales qualified.’ For the latter group, if sales is passing back a lot of leads, this indicates the criteria for transitioning a lead needs to be tweaked. Look at examples of leads that were passed back and what about their criteria missed the mark. Set up a meeting to review these examples.”

Click the image to read Duek’s full article.

 

 

Consumers Down on Data Mining

28 Jun

As we have reported many times (see, for example, 1, 2, 3, 4), privacy and identity theft are important issues for all of us. With that in mind, a critical question for data miners is: How do consumers feel about data-mining practices being deployed by companies and other organizations?

Consider these observations from Natasha Singer, writing for the New York Times:

“Should consumers be able to control how companies collect and use their personal data? At a dinner honoring privacy advocates this week in Washington, Timothy D. Cook, the chief executive of Apple, gave a speech in which he endorsed this simple idea. Yet his argument leveled a direct challenge to the premise behind much of the Internet industry — the proposition that people blithely cede their digital bread crumbs to companies in exchange for free or reduced-priced services subsidized by advertising. You might like these so-called free services,’ Mr. Cook said during the event held by EPIC, a nonprofit research center. “But we don’t think they’re worth having your email or your search history or now even your family photos data-mined and sold off for God knows what advertising purpose.”

Now a study from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania has come to a similar conclusion: Many Americans do not think the trade-off of their data for personalized services, giveaways or discounts is a fair deal either. The findings are likely to fuel the debate among tech executives and federal regulators over whether companies should give consumers more control over the information collected about them.”

 
Click the NY Times infographic to read more of Singer’s article.
 

 

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