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What Do Americans Shoplift Most Often?

11 Nov

Shoplifting in retail stores accounts for billions and billions of dollars around the globe. In the United States alone, annual shoplifting losses amount to $13+ billion.

Take a look at this NEW  YouTube video from the Wall Street Journal to see what items are shoplifted most frequently in the United States.


Bloomberg 2016 Forecasts

10 Nov

About this time each year, a number of well-known, reliable sources produce their forecasts for the  following year.

Bloomberg (via its Bloomberg Businessweek) has just published its “The Year Ahead 2016” issue. Here is a video overview of the year ahead. It is followed by a link to the 50 companies to watch in 2016. Just click the chart to see an online discussion of the 50 companies covered.




24/7 Wall St.: A Valuable Site to Visit

2 Nov

24/7 Wall St. is a very useful site about which you may be unfamiliar. It has articles across all areas of business, top ten lists, and a lot more.

Here’s one interesting area in which 24/7 Wall St. reports:

“Each year, 24/7 Wall St. identifies 10 American brands that we predict will disappear, either through bankruptcies or because of mergers. Bankruptcies of large public companies in 2015 have already exceeded 2014 totals. Similarly, the total value of mergers and acquisitions is projected to hit a record high in 2015. While some of the companies on this list may disappear because they continue to be at the bottom of their industry, some may disappear because they are doing well. Over the years, some of our predictions have been better than others. Some of our predictions — like Alaska Air — have been dead wrong. Other brands we said would disappear — like Aeropostale — have survived but are still failing companies. Blockbuster, DirecTV, American Apparel, and Sony Ericsson are among the brands that have gone bankrupt or have been acquired since appearing on our list. These brands have not yet disappeared completely, but may still in the near future.”


And here are some specific examples of what 24/7 Wall St. publishes:


Click the image to visit 24/7 Wall St.


Devising Great Slogans

29 Oct

The effectiveness of slogans, trademarks, tag lines, and other promotional tools can sometimes make or break a brand. That is why so many companies are so engaged in these tools.

As noted by Lindsay Kolowich for HubSpot:

“You might not remember the exact content of the Taco Bell commercial you saw last week, but you probably remember the punchy slogan — ‘Think outside the bun’ — followed by the ding of a bell. What makes a slogan like Taco Bell’s so sticky? How can you make sure yours will be memorable, too? For data-driven tips on what makes a slogan successful, check out the infographic below from SiteProNews. You’ll learn the factors of what makes a great slogan and get examples of some of the most successful slogans of all time. (And check out this blog post for a more in-depth look at some brands with really catchy slogans.).”



A McKinsey Report: How Innovative Are the Chinese?

26 Oct

McKinsey & Company regularly publishes reports about doing business in China. Click here to visit its McKinsey China Web site.

McKinsey firm has just produced a new report on Chinese innovativeness:

“New research by the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) suggests that to realize consensus growth forecasts—5.5 to 6.5 percent a year—during the coming decade, China must generate two to three percentage points of annual GDP growth through innovation, broadly defined. If it does, innovation could contribute much of the $3 trillion to $5 trillion a year to GDP by 2025. China will have evolved from an ‘innovation sponge,’ absorbing and adapting existing technology and knowledge from around the world, into a global innovation leader.”

“Our analysis suggests that this transformation is possible, though far from inevitable. To date, when we have evaluated how well Chinese companies commercialize new ideas and use them to raise market share and profits and to compete around the world, the picture has been decidedly mixed. China has become a strong innovator in areas such as consumer electronics and construction equipment. Yet in others—creating new drugs or designing automobile engines, for example—the country still isn’t globally competitive. That’s true even though every year it spends more than $200 billion on research (second only to the United States), turns out close to 30,000 Ph.Ds in science and engineering, and leads the world in patent applications (more than 820,000 in 2013).”

“When we look ahead, though, we see broad swaths of opportunity. Our analysis suggests that by 2025, such new innovation opportunities could contribute $1.0 trillion to $2.2 trillion a year to the Chinese economy—or equivalent to up to 24 percent of total GDP growth.”

Click the image to access the full report.


UPS: Monitoring Change in the Global Supply Chain

23 Oct

The global supply chain is sure getting more complex. UPS annually conducts a B2B survey to see what is changing in how the supply chain moves merchandise from manufacturers to their customers.

To read about UPS’ latest research and view on industry trends, download its 5th annual UPS Change in the (Supply) Chain survey by clicking here.

And take a look at this summary UPS video.



Tesla’s New $2,500 Software Download for Self-Driving

19 Oct

Last week, we posted about self-driving cars, asking: Is “The Self-Driving Car: Coming Tomorrow Or in 2020+?”

Well, Tesla has certainly given its answer to that question. As reported by Aaron M. Kessler for the New York Times:

“The updated Tesla, an already high-tech electric car that starts at about $75,000, was equipped with what the company calls Autopilot — a semi-autonomous [self-driving] feature that allows hands-free, pedal-free driving on the highway under certain conditions. The car will even change lanes autonomously at the driver’s request (by hitting the turn signal) and uses sensors to scan the road in all directions and adjust the throttle, steering, and brakes. It is the first time that a production vehicle available to consumers will have such advanced self-driving capabilities.

“Autopilot is not free (the download costs $2,500), and it is not yet perfected (clear lane markings are needed, and bad weather can affect its abilities), but it works remarkably well under normal circumstances.”

Check out the NYT’s video below.




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