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2014 Global Patent Filings

21 Mar

According to the WIPO Web site:

“Intellectual property (IP) refers to creations of the mind, such as inventions; literary and artistic works; designs; and symbols, names, and images used in commerce. IP is protected in law by, for example, patents, copyright, and trademarks, which enable people to earn recognition or financial benefit from what they invent or create. By striking the right balance between the interests of innovators and the wider public interest, the IP system aims to foster an environment in which creativity and innovation can flourish.”

“The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) is the global forum for intellectual property policy, services, information and cooperation. A specialized agency of the United Nations, WIPO assists its 188 member states in developing a balanced international IP legal framework to meet society’s evolving needs. It provides business services for obtaining IP rights in multiple countries and resolving disputes. It delivers capacity-building programs to help developing countries benefit from using IP. And it provides free access to unique knowledge banks of IP information.”

Here is an infographic about global patent filings in 2014.
 
infographics_pct_2014
 

An Infographic Dictionary for Business Founders

20 Mar

Often times, the lingo involved with startups is in a class by itself. So, what terminology is essential for business founders to know?

As Pedro Sanchez de Lozada writes for Udemy, an online educational firm:

“Silicon Valley not only has its share of startups and founders. It has its own lucrative lingo. Outsiders need time to adjust to such new-found words. Though we see this same lingo popping up in places like New York, Boston, Portland and LA, the Valley is home to some of the most outrageously butchered start-up buzzwords.”

“If you are just visiting, here for a long-term stay, or moving all together, I suggest you become familiar with how the left coasters chat. You may need to know this at your next pitch. Oh, and more importantly, don’t take these definitions too seriously.”

Check out Udemy’s “Founder’s Dictionary.”
 

 

Generating Pricing Power

11 Mar

In this era of cost-cutting and price discounting, it has become harder for many firms to price their products in a profitable manner. Yet, this can be done!

As McKinsey’s Jay Jubas, Dieter Kiewell, and Georg Winkler report:

“Companies often overlook pricing as a driver of earnings growth, instead defaulting to cost cutting and other measures. Here are five steps to growth through pricing.”

  1. Provide meaningful transparency into pricing data — Pricing managers often lack a clear understanding of how profitability varies among regions and product lines, and they know even less about how it can vary among individual customers or transactions. Yet these all have an important influence on pricing and sales decisions.”
  2. Understand what customers really value — For all the sophistication provided by advanced analytics to master a complex array of prices, the price of a product or service ultimately depends on how much a customer thinks it’s worth—that is, ‘value pricing.’ The best companies augment pricing analytics with detailed customer insights to identify all the key buying factors that determine how much a product is worth to a given customer, understand how those factors compare with competitors’ offers, and quantify the value created for the customer.”
  3. Move from sales reps to ‘value negotiators’ — Determining the best price means nothing if sales reps can’t convince customers to accept it. For this reason, it’s critical that sales reps have important pricing capabilities, such as sound judgment to manage time, negotiate thoughtfully, and adjust pricing guidelines in order to maximize value and minimize the risk of customers defecting.”
  4. Provide on-the-job training to build confidence — While most companies understand it’s important to build the pricing skills of their people, few move beyond basic training in classes or online. Successful companies, however, use adult-learning techniques, such as experiential learning, to embed the new skills in the front line.”
  5. Change the culture – In our experience, even the best pricing programs will fail in the long term without a deliberate commitment to overcome the entrenched habits and shifting priorities that doom most change programs.”

Click the image to read a lot more.
 
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A New Golden Age for Marketing?

10 Mar

The modern field of marketing has had a nice long run — and steadily evolved along with technology and customer trends. So, has the marketing discipline peaked or are the best times still ahead?

According to McKinsey’s Jonathan Gordon and Jesko Perrey, we are entering “the dawn of marketing’s new golden age. Marketers are boosting their precision, broadening their scope, moving more quickly, and telling better stories.”

To summarize Gordon and Perrey:

“Science has permeated marketing for decades. Fans of the television drama Mad Men saw a fictionalized encounter when an IBM System/360 mainframe computer physically displaced the creative department of a late-1960s advertising agency. In reality, though, the 1960s through the early 1990s witnessed a happy marriage of advertising and technology as marketers mastered both the medium of television and the science of Nielsen ratings. These years gave birth to iconic advertising messages in categories ranging from sparkling beverages (‘I’d like to buy the world a Coke’) to credit cards (‘American Express. Don’t leave home without it’) to air travel (‘British Airways: the world’s favourite airline’).”

“Until recently, marketers could be forgiven for looking back wistfully at this golden age as new forces reshaped their world into something completely different. These new trends include a massive proliferation of television and online channels, the transformation of the home PC into a retail channel, the unrelenting rise of mobile social media and gaming, and—with all these trends—a constant battle for the consumer’s attention.”

“The resulting expansion of platforms has propelled consistent growth in marketing expenditures, which now total as much as $1 trillion globally. The efficacy of this spending is under deep scrutiny. For example, in a survey of CEOs, close to three out of four agreed with the following statement: marketers ‘are always asking for more money, but can rarely explain how much incremental business this money will generate.’ Chief marketing officers (CMOs), it appears, don’t disagree: in another recent survey, just over one-third said they had quantitatively proved the impact of their marketing outlays. Paradoxically, though, CEOs are looking to their CMOs more than ever, because they need top-line growth and view marketing as a critical lever to help them achieve it. Can marketers deliver amid ongoing performance pressures?”

Click the image to read a LOT more.
 

 

Marketing Budgets Report 2015

6 Mar

Marketing budgets in 2015 are expected to grow, in some cases, for the first time in years.

As Nicola Cooper reports for Responsys:

“The Econsultancy Marketing Budgets Report 2015, created in association with Oracle Marketing Cloud, delves into marketers’ expected spend for the coming year and is a great opportunity to see whether you are facing similar challenges to the rest of the industry and inform your priorities for the year.”

“Because a customer’s decision to buy now involves many interactions with a brand, delivering an orchestrated approach is essential for any brand to attract and retain customers. It’s clear that our industry is aware of this; this year’s report indicates that nearly three quarters (74%) of the companies surveyed believe they are working towards delivering unified customer experiences, rather than standalone campaigns or interactions. In addition, 71% of the companies surveyed say that they are focusing on ‘breaking down internal silos to better co-ordinate and integrate [their] marketing efforts’. Marketers are unifying marketing strategy as well as unifying the marketing teams delivering those campaigns.”

“More generally, the findings also indicate that marketers are more likely to be increasing overall budgets for the year ahead than at any time since the launch of our first Marketing Budgets Report in 2010, during the height of the economic crisis. Winning areas include marketing technologies and digital marketing, as a result of stronger boardroom support.”

Click the image to read more.
 

 

Who’s Winning the Mobile OS Challenge?

24 Feb

The answer to this question has certainly changed over the last couple of years. Here’s how it has changed. Sorry, Apple fans. :-).

As reported by eMarketer:

“According to data released in February 2015 by Opera Mediaworks, Google’s operating system (OS) grew its share of mobile ad impressions worldwide by more than 66% between Q4 2013 and Q4 2014, from 37.7% to 62.7%, leapfrogging iOS to claim first place.”

Click the image to read a lot more about what is happening.
 

 

Fraud and Brand Safety Are Key to Ad Buyers

23 Feb

What factors are important to digital advertising buyers?

According to eMarketer:

“From the looks of it, ad fraud, viewability, and brand safety may turn out to be big digital ad buzz phrases this year. In a November 2014 study by Integral Ad Science, these emerged as the three most important aspects of media quality among US digital media buyers. One-third of respondents in this group ranked ad fraud as No. 1, while brand safety accounted for 26% of responses and viewability over one-fifth.”

 
 Click the image to read more.
 

 

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