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Evans on Marketing’s Most Popular Posts for the First Half of 2015

3 Jul

Thank you for reading our evansonmarketing.com posts. :-)

Here are the most popular 12 posts thus far in 2015 (January 1-June 30). Take a look if you missed any of them:

  1. See How Well You Can Do on This Entertaining Marketing Quiz (Because this quiz is no longer available, here is another interesting one for you: 5 Things You Thought You Knew About Interactive Content)
  2. What Job Skills Will Be Most Important in 2020?
  3. Body Language Errors to Avoid During Interviews
  4. What Are the Toughest Languages to Translate?
  5. Looking to Generate Passion? Consider Using the Color Red
  6. Social Marketing Tips
  7. Do YOU Think Before You Tweet?
  8. Personalizing Marketing
  9. Ten Marketing-Oriented Business Trends to Consider: A Slideshow
  10. Does Rebranding Always Work?
  11. Video and Social Media Are Big in the Mobile Era
  12. Pay More Attention to Loyal Customers!

 

 

Marketing and Sales: Better Cooperation Needed

29 Jun

Even though, a company’s sales personnel are typically viewed as part of the marketing function, there are also differences of opinion and sometimes conflicts between marketing and sales. Instead, mutual respect and cooperation need to rule the day!

As Hadar Duek observes for HubSpot:

“In my job, I chat with marketers very often about what problems they’re facing. One of the most common issues I hear about is lead flow — a marketing department generates hundreds of leads per month, but many of them aren’t closing. Nobody knows where to turn. Sales points fingers at marketing. Marketing points fingers at sales. They both shrug, unsure of how to proceed. To get the partnership running effectively again, there are three things I recommend marketers start doing with their sales team.”

1) “Provide sales training on how inbound leads are different. Many sales reps are trained to aggressively go after leads who will close ASAP — and ignore the ones who won’t. When I was in sales, I did the same thing. If a prospect wasn’t ready to send in a purchase order in the next week, I was onto the next lead. With limited time and an endless universe of opportunities, I had to prioritize. This mentality needs to shift when your company is generating inbound leads. Just because someone became a lead by downloading an E-book doesn’t mean they are ready to buy something immediately. On the other hand, they may very well be a great fit for your company down the line.”

2) “Develop a feedback loop between marketing and sales. How often have you seen leads go sales, receive follow-up, and then fall into a black hole? In my work with HubSpot customers, I see it all the time. This is a huge missed opportunity. To prevent this lack of communication, set up a way for sales to pass leads back into the nurturing funnel based on what they learned in the initial qualifying conversation. They like pink? Put them into the all-pink text E-mail nurturing campaign. They like chocolate sandwiches? Put them into the E-mail nurturing campaigns with lots of chocolate sandwiches.”

3) Set up regular meetings between marketing and sales. Some marketers pass all leads directly to their sales team and others only pass over the ones that meet criteria they determine as ‘sales qualified.’ For the latter group, if sales is passing back a lot of leads, this indicates the criteria for transitioning a lead needs to be tweaked. Look at examples of leads that were passed back and what about their criteria missed the mark. Set up a meeting to review these examples.”

Click the image to read Duek’s full article.

 

 

A Provocative Take on the Future of Self-Driving Cars

26 Jun

Self-driving cars are in the late stages of testing in the United States. Besides safety issues, consumer skepticism, the regulatory environment will have a major impact on how quickly and widely that self-driving cars make it in the market.

Given that self-driving cars will/may be sold in the very near future, we need to better understand where the marketplace will be headed. Recently, McKinsey’s Michele Bertoncello and Dominik Weewe published a thought-provoking view of self-driving cars: “Ten Ways Autonomous Driving Could Redefine the Automotive World — The Development of Self-Driving, or Autonomous, Vehicles Is Accelerating. Here’s How They Could Affect Consumers and Companies.”

  1. “Industrial fleets lead the way.”
  2.  “Car OEMs [original equipment manufacturers face a decision. Automakers worldwide will likely define and communicate their strategic position on AVs in the next two to three years.”
  3.  “New mobility models emerge. While OEMs are developing autonomous vehicles, a variety of other transport-mobility innovations are already hitting the road.”
  4.  “The car-service landscape changes.”
  5.  “Car insurers might shift their business model. Car insurers have always provided consumer coverage in the event of accidents caused by human error. With driverless vehicles, auto insurers might shift the core of their business model, focusing mainly on insuring car manufacturers from liabilities from technical failure of their AVs, as opposed to protecting private customers from risks associated with human error in accidents.”
  6.  “Companies could reshape their supply chains.”
  7.  “Drivers have more time for everything. AVs could free as much as 50 minutes a day for users, who will be able to spend traveling time working, relaxing, or accessing entertainment.”
  8.  “Parking becomes easier. AVs could change the mobility behavior of consumers, potentially reducing the need for parking space in the United States by more than 5.7 billion square meters.”
  9.  “Accident rates drop. By mid-century, the penetration of AVs and other ADAS could ultimately cause vehicle crashes in the United States to fall from second to ninth place in terms of their lethality ranking among accident types.”
  10.  “AVs accelerate robotics development for consumer applications.”

 
Click the chart to read the full article.

McK1
 

Regulatory Issues In Europe for U.S. Tech Companies

24 Jun

For quite a while, the European Commission has been rather tough in regulating large  American companies doing business in Europe and penalizing them when their practices are deemed unacceptable — sometimes, billions of dollars in fines as well as changes in business activities.

As Kelly Couturier  recently noted for the New York Times: ” The biggest American tech companies face intensifying scrutiny by European regulators — pressure that could potentially curb their sizable profits in the region and affect how they operate around the world.”

Here are some examples from Couturier:

  • Amazon — Antitrust: “The European Commission opened an investigation in June 2015 into whether the company used its dominant position in the region’s E-books market to make it harder for rivals to offer lower prices.” Taxation: “The European Union released a preliminary finding in January 2015 that a tax deal between Amazon and Luxembourg appears to amount to unfair state aid that may have enabled the company to underpay its taxes.”
  • Apple Antitrust: “European competition officials confirmed in April 2015 that they had sent questionnaires to music labels and rival music streaming companies to gather evidence and decide whether to open an antitrust investigation into Apple’s new music service.” Taxation: “Officials opened an investigation in June 2014 into whether Ireland gave preferential tax treatment to Apple.
  • Facebook Data privacy: “French, Italian, and Spanish privacy officials announced in early April 2015 they had opened investigations into the social network’s privacy policies; similar inquiries have already been started by Dutch, Belgian, and German officials. The regulators are asking whether Facebook gained sufficient approval from users when the company gained access to their online data.”
  • Google Antitrust: “In April, the European Union’s antitrust chief, Margrethe Vestager, formally charged the company of abusing its dominance in Web searches, accusing it of diverting traffic from its rivals to favor its own products and services, particularly Web sites for shopping.” Right to Be Forgotten: “Europe’s highest court ruled in May 2014 that citizens have a so-called right to be forgotten, and that search engines, including Google, must honor some requests from users to delete links to personal information.”
  • Microsoft Antitrust: “In a long-running antitrust case involving Microsoft’s software and interoperability, the company paid almost €2 billion in European fines over a decade, including a penalty in 2013 for failing to adhere to an earlier settlement.”Right to Be Forgotten: Microsoft, which operates the Bing search service, signaled in July 2014 that it planned to follow the lead of Google, by creating an online form that lets individuals request removal of links to material they say violates their online privacy.”

 

 

Click the image to read Couturier’s full article.
 

Shown here: An Apple store in Berlin. Credit Adam Berry/Getty Images for Apple

 

Doing Better with Google Analytics: An Infographic

15 Jun

Over the years, we have posted several times about the importance and value of Google Analytics for marketers. See, for example, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

So, you are using Google Analytics as part of your Web site analysis, right? You are doing everything you can to score well on Google Analytics, right?

Here is an infographic from QuickSprout to help you do even better.

 

 

SEO for Google: Don’t Penalize Yourself Through Improper Actions!

14 Jun

Search engine optimization (SEO) for Google and other search engines requires a careful balance. We want to do everything we can to boost our search engine ranking, while at the same time avoiding actions that may penalize our ranking.

As Neil Patel puts it for QuickSprout:

“Are you worried about getting an algorithmic or manual penalty? In most cases, you shouldn’t, but if you are dabbling in SEO, you need to make sure you aren’t breaking any rules. To help you avoid any current or future Google penalties, I’ve created an infographic that shows you what you should and shouldn’t do.”

Take a look at Patel’s infographic below. Click the image for a larger view.

 


 

Amazon and Its “Minions”

9 Jun

The ever-aggressive Amazon recently entered into its first promotional movie tie-in with Minions, an animated film opening in mid-July 2015.

As reported by Sarah Perez for Tech Crunch

“Forget billboards or magazine ads. If an advertiser wants to put its brand in front of a big audience today, you may as well slap that ad on an Amazon shipping box. Or, at least, that’s the mindset behind the new partnership between Universal Pictures and Illumination Entertainment and Amazon. The retailer has begun to ship customer orders in bright yellow delivery boxes featuring cartoon characters from the upcoming Minions movie. The deal represents the first time Amazon has ever allowed a third party to completely brand its delivery boxes, the company tells us.”

“The pairing between the movie makers and Amazon makes sense for this latest installment in the Despicable Me franchise of films. The popular movies, which to date have grossed over $1.5 billion at the box office worldwide, have already turned the film’s characters into merchandise.”

Click the image to read more.
 

 

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