Informative Video Overviews of Careers in Marketing

30 Sep

ReKruiTIn, an India-based recruitment firm, has put together a nice YouTube video on marketing careers. This video is valuable for anyone considering a career in marketing, regardless of their country or region. :-)
 

 
Job-Interview-Site.com has also developed a useful video interview of a career in marketing.
 

 

Good Versus Bad B2B Clients: An Infographic

29 Sep

Whether B2C or B2B in nature, there are both “good” and  “bad” customers. Good customers have reasonable expectations and do not seek to take advantage of their sellers (and vice versa!). Bad customers can make unreasonable demands and try to squeeze sellers so they don’t make a profit.

Geek Powered Studios, a Web design and SEO firm, offers some very insightful observations on this topic with regard to the B2B arena:

“Even though every client is different, the best-case scenario for any business partnership is one that’s beneficial for both you and the client. You get to do what you do best, so they can gain more business doing what they do best. At the end of the day, you both want their company to be successful. But that can be tough to achieve if you’re always working against each other.”

“As you take on more business, you’ll learn the needs and preferences of each client and their industry. You’re also going to meet a wide variety of client personalities – from the ones who don’t check in for weeks to the ones who micromanage your every click. There will be clients who listen to your suggestions and provide feedback, but there will be others who are never satisfied and expect to be #1 overnight. Some clients may even threaten to drop their contract and just do it themselves, but they should keep in mind that only 11% of businesses who do their own SEO in-house are satisfied with the results.”

Here’s an infographic on good versus bad B2B customers from Geek Powered Studios.
 

 

Snapchat Hits Three: Here’s an Infographic Timeline

28 Sep

It has certainly been an interesting ride for Snapchat since its September 2011 founding: “Enjoy fast and fun mobile conversation! Snap a photo or a video, add a caption, and send it to a friend. They’ll view it, laugh, and then the Snap disappears.”

Here is a detailed infographic timeline of Snapchat by DPFOC Online Marketing.
 

 

Tips for Getting Your Dream Job

26 Sep

We’ve made many posts on career planning and development. In fact, we have a full category on this topic – with about 200 posts.

We’d like to add to this library with a good multimedia presentation by Fortune related to “9 tips to land your dream job.”

As Erika Frey writes:

“Ah, the dream job. Just as work has been reshaped by technology and globalization, so too have our professional fantasies. While jobs atop the corporate ladder haven’t totally lost their luster, more and more Americans are seeking work-life balance. And now that leaner, recession-tested firms are hiring again, they’re looking for something different too. Given the new landscape, we asked a few ­experts —­ career coaches, headhunters, and recruiters — to weigh in with their best, most relevant tips for today. The old rules still ­apply—network, network, network!—but here’s the latest on how to land that ideal job, whatever it may be.”

Click here to read the 9 tips.

Click the image to view a Fortune video about these tips.
 

 

Where Luxury Is Headed Worldwide

24 Sep

According to consulting firm McKinsey:

Between now and 2025, the world’s top 600 cities (measured by absolute GDP) are expected to drive nearly two-thirds of global economic growth. Massive urbanization will continue across emerging markets, which will envelope three-quarters of these large cities. It is projected that by 2025, there will be 60 megacities — more than double the current number of urban behemoths — where GDP will exceed $250 billion, accounting for a full one-quarter of global GDP.”

As of 2025, “out of the 25 largest growth-contributing cities, 21 will be located in emerging markets, with a significant number of them in China. This represents a great leap from today’s status quo, in which only 4 of the 25 wealthiest cities are found in the developing world. Yet economic growth does not automatically mean consumption development — or luxury-market growth. Market growth in these cities is indeed conditioned by specific factors that differ from city to city. Variables such as birth rate, wealth distribution, and share of working women correspondingly affect growth in categories such as baby food, beauty products, luxury goods, and women’s fashion. To prioritize their efforts, companies will need to identify the biggest and fastest-growing cities with regard to their particular products and services.”

In McKinsey’s report The Glittering Power of Cities for Luxury Growth, Aimee Kim, Nathalie Remy, and Jennifer Schmidt describe “a road map of where luxury-goods companies should compete in the next decade.”

Here are two charts from that report.

 

 

 

Capitalizing on the Power of Social Media Review Sites

23 Sep

We have written a lot about the power of social media — both good and bad. For example, see these recent posts: 1, 2, 3. So, what more can we do to capitalize on the power of social media review sites?

According to Paula Andruss, writing for Entrepreneur, there are six things to consider doing:

  1. Develop a detail-loaded presence. “Whether you’re initiating a new profile or ‘claiming’ one that’s already on the Web, it’s important to fill out your listing as fully and accurately as possible. To optimize your SEO, it is important to have one standard and accurate listing on every site that mentions your company; if your listing varies among sites, it may be pushed down in search results.”
  2. Read the fine print. “Michael Dash, president of New York-based CarPartKings.com, relies heavily on review sites to validate his company and let users know what to expect from his service. But after purchasing a yearly program with an industry-specific ratings site, he found that as traffic to his E-commerce business increased, so did the charges to keep the reviews coming — rising from $50 per month to $1,000. Within a day of refusing to pay the increased rate, all of his positive reviews disappeared, while the negative ones remained. ‘We learned our lesson the hard way,’ Dash says.”
  3. Accrue reviews and keep them fresh. “Establishing a listing is not enough; you need to solidify your presence by gathering as many reviews as possible. While the algorithms used to determine your company’s placement on these sites is mysterious at best, having a greater number of reviews can improve your landing results over competitors on the results page of a local search.”
  4. Avoid filter triggers. “One of the biggest frustrations with review sites is that they can (and do) filter legitimate reviews so that they may be hard to find — or even removed — based on individual site parameters. Yelp’s policy states that it will filter reviews it believes have been solicited. Yelp and other sites also commonly filter comments from people who have written only a single review; those that are too glowing, which may appear fake; and even those that are too negative, because they may have been written by a competitor.”
  5. Respond carefully to bad or false reviews. “Poor reviews can hurt, but it’s important to respond in a calm and professional manner. Factually incorrect reviews are another problem, but the complaint system to have them removed is difficult and often unsuccessful. So it may be preferable to simply continue to collect reviews so that the questionable ones are outweighed.”
  6. Invest wisely. “As long as your business is operating smoothly, consider enlisting the help of services that might make these sites work better for you. For example, Bazaarvoice Express automatically requests reviews from customers that can be posted on your site, and Moz has a tool that will standardize local listings on major aggregators for about $50 per year.”

Click the image to read the full article by Andruss.
 

 Image credit: Theispot.com/Leon Mussche

 

Great Advice from Successful Business Founders

22 Sep

Our most popular post to date — by far — has been The Best Advice Received — and Passed On — by Leaders of Industry.” That post referred to advice by some of our best-known business “luminaries,” who have managed large firms.

However, there is also quite A LOT that we can learn from the entrepreneurs who have introduced and managed successful businesses that started out quite small.

Recently, Entrepreneur‘s Matt Villano interviewed several company founders and titled the article: “The Best Business Advice You’ll Ever Get.” [Notice the similarity in the title of our earlier post. :-) ] As Villano notes:

“Being an entrepreneur doesn’t mean you have to go it alone. Most successful business owners will tell you they could not have accomplished their goals without help — from a mentor, colleague, even mom and dad. For many, their ability to evaluate, internalize, and act on the counsel they received was instrumental in getting their companies off the ground. In an effort to tap some of this wisdom, we called on business gurus to tell us the very best piece of advice they’ve received. From hiring to philanthropy and more, their responses were as varied as the companies they run.”

These are some the executives whom Villano interviewed and who provided advice:

  • Dennis Crowley, CEO, Foursquare
  • Rick Alden, Founder, Skullcandy
  • Petera Relan, Founder, 9+
  • Sheila Johnson, Founder and CEO, Salamander Hotels & Resorts
  • Melinda Emerson, Founder and CEO, Quintessence Group
  • Christine Day, CEO, Luvo
  • Rehan Choudhry, Founder, Life is Beautiful
  • Reece Pacheco, Founder, Shelby.tv
  • Nick Lazaris, President and CEO, Coravin

Click Dennis Crowley’s photo to read Villano’s full interviews.
 

Photo © Ewan Burns

 

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