Resume Tips You Can Use

1 Apr

In this post, let us discuss six aspects of resume design – and provide tips accordingly:

  •   What is the purpose of a resume?

A resume should attract the attention of a prospective employer and interest the prospective employer to invite the applicant to an interview. A resume is NOT the vehicle for a person to present his/her life story. It IS the vehicle to provide the relevant and distinctive background of the applicant.

  •  Should there be an opening summary at the top of the resume?

For two reasons, the answer to this question is yes. One, this immediately lets the prospective employer  recognize the type of job for which the applicant is applying. Two, an opening summary enables the applicant to create his/her self brand and highlight what makes that individual unique.

To learn more about the value of self branding, read here.

  • How should you decide what content to include on the resume?

Although it is essential to include one’s education, work experience, and special skills on a resume, it is also vital not to overwhelm the prospective employer with too much information. The reader will most likely skim the resume and find a densely-worded resume not worth the effort. In addition, by having too much content, the reader is not guided to the most important information.

Here a few specific tips: (1) Ask yourself this question and address it through your resume — What the are the five to ten top reasons why a potential employer should hire me instead of another applicant (your competitive advantages)? (2) Highlight your accomplishments — not just your past job functions. (3) Do NOT place as much emphasis on a job you had five years ago as the one you had most recently. [I am continuously amazed by how many resumes I review for my students and alumni that have as many bullet points for an internship they had as their full-time jobs!!]

  •  How long should your resume be?

Over the years, I have reviewed thousands of resumes. I still firmly believe that one page is sufficient for an applicant at any level of experience. But some others differ and think a slightly longer resume is acceptable IF one is looking for a senior-level position. The following is a very good rule to keep in mind, as provided by Careers Plus Resumes for Careerealism:

“A resume will first receive a very brief scan, often 10-20 seconds, to determine if the candidate appears to meet the major requirements. While the entire resume may be quickly scanned, utilizing a summary of qualifications with keywords and phrases based upon one’s career goal and job target is advantageous. A resume that passes the initial scan will then receive greater scrutiny to determine if a candidate qualifies for an interview. Here, relevant depth and detail in the history is best since the candidate’s experience, skills, and strengths – as they apply to the position – will be more thoroughly assessed.”

  • Is it OK to use one version of a resume for all possible jobs?

NO! NO! NO! In this era of easy-to-adapt Word files, it is inexcusable to use the same resume for all jobs. You want the potential employer to be interested in you. So, show you are interested in them. Tailor your resume to the specific job opening and potential employer. One size does NOT fit all.

Consider these observations from Dawn Rasmussen, writing for Careerealism:

“As we go through our careers, our background evolves into probably at least three or more different thematic areas. In my lifetime, I’ve been a meeting planner, television producer, tourism manager, educator, and resume writer, to name a few. Can I pull all of these areas under one roof/one resume? Not a chance. No one could possibly digest it all – there is too much stuff ‘muddying’ the waters. The trick to hitting a moving target is to get grounded first.”

Focus On One Area

Take a deep breath and think about what area you are actually going to have the highest degree of job search success. Then focus your efforts on that area. I would suggest one, two, but no more than three major areas. Then create a separate document for EACH of those themes.

Create A ‘Relevant History’ Header

Create a section header entitled “RELEVANT HISTORY,” then list the job records most relevant to the position to which you are applying first, then summarize (if necessary) any non-relevant ones to avoid distracting the reader. That way, you can account for any holes that open up in your work experience caused by moving non-relevant history into an “Additional Background” header.
Read more at http://www.careerealism.com/resume-versions-need/#zArwl7fddZdg5oFL.99

Can I pull all of these areas under one roof/one resume?

Not a chance. No one could possibly digest it all – there is too much stuff “muddying” the waters if, say, I were to apply to be a faculty member in a post-secondary school. The trick to hitting those moving target is to get grounded first.

Focus On One Area

Take a deep breath and think about what area you are actually going to have the highest degree of job search success. Then focus your efforts on that area. I would suggest one, two, but no more than three major areas. Then create a separate document for EACH of those themes.

Create A ‘Relevant History’ Header

Create a section header entitled “RELEVANT HISTORY,” then list the job records most relevant to the position to which you are applying first, then summarize (if necessary) any non-relevant ones to avoid distracting the reader. That way, you can account for any holes that open up in your work experience caused by moving non-relevant history into an “Additional Background” header.

“Take a deep breath and think about what area you are actually going to have the highest degree of job search success. Then focus your efforts on that area. I would suggest one, two, but no more than three major areas. Then create a separate document for EACH of those themes. Create a section header entitled ‘RELEVANT HISTORY,’ then list the job records most relevant to the position to which you are applying first, then summarize (if necessary) any non-relevant ones to avoid distracting the reader. That way, you can account for any holes that open up in your work experience caused by moving non-relevant history into an ‘Additional Background’ header.”
  • Does the “look”  of the resume matter?
Yes, it does. These are some typical mistakes to avoid: (1) Do not use an overly small font. (2) Do not have small margins. (3) Do not have spelling or grammatical mistakes. (4) Do not use plain copy paper; use quality paper. (5) Do not use exotic paper colors; stick to white or off-white.

 
 

GOOD LUCK!
[As Branch Rickey, the Brooklyn Dodgers general manager who signed Jackie Robinson to be the first African-American to play Major League Baseball, once said: “Luck is the residue of hard work and design.”]

 

It’s Not Just About Happy Customers; Angry Customers Matter Too

31 Mar

All companies — large and small — treasure and understand the value of their happiest customers. The number and loyalty of these customers is often the difference between success and failure.

But, how should we deal with angry customers? As a general rule, we should not give up on them until we understand their feelings and try to turn those negative feelings around.

Consider these observations from Vision Critical, which provides a cloud-based customer intelligence platform that allows companies to build engaged, secure communities of customers:

“The value of your happiest customers is well understood, but the influence and potential of angry customers should not be underestimated. On average, Americans tell nearly twice as many people about negative experiences as positive ones, and the anger of the social media-empowered customer can easily go viral and inspire a movement. Of the millions of people who post tweets about customer service every week, 80 percent are negative. All it takes is the right hashtag at the right moment to turn one person’s gripe into a social media maelstrom.”

Take a look at this in-depth white paper from Vision Critical.
 

Vision Critical

 

Measuring Public Relations Effectiveness

30 Mar

How effective are a company’s public relations efforts? The answer to this question has become even more complex in this era of online viral marketing and word of mouth. It’s not enough to just count mentions, etc., as we did in the past.

According to Onboardly, a demand marketing agency that helps small and medium-sized companies fast-track visibility, brand awareness, and lead generation by working at the intersection where public relations, content marketing, and social media meet, to deliver marketing that gets results:

“PR is still a mystery to many. Press releases. How some make it onto TechCrunch and others with equally great products or stories remain unknown. Say the words ‘PR Metrics’ and you’ll get an even more quizzical face in response.”

“Some question the value of PR for their business and well. PR metrics are what demonstrate the need and the effectiveness for tactics such as earned media, influencer relations, content marketing, and good old-fashioned press mentions. We’re firm believers in the power of PR to make big things happen – no matter how small the company or the size of the budget.”

We’ve developed this infographic as a way to explain a bit behind what PR is as well as what it can do.”

 
PR Metrics That Matter
 

The World’s Most Ethical Companies According to the Ethisphere Institute

29 Mar

There are various reports about the most ethical firms in the world. One of the most comprehensive such reports is compiled by the Ethisphere® Institute.

According to its Web site:

“The Ethisphere® Institute is the global leader in defining and advancing the standards of ethical business practices that fuel corporate character, marketplace trust and business success. We have a deep expertise in measuring and defining core ethics standards using data-driven insights that help companies enhance corporate character. Ethisphere believes integrity and transparency impact the public trust and the bottom line of any organization. The World’s Most Ethical Companies is a distinction that honors superior achievements in transparency, integrity, ethics and compliance.”

“The World’s Most Ethical Companies® designation recognizes companies that truly go beyond making statements about doing business “ethically” and translate those words into action. Honorees not only promote ethical business standards and practices internally, they exceed legal compliance minimums and shape future industry standards by introducing best practices today. In 2015, 132 honorees were named spanning 21 countries and five continents and representing over 50 industries. In its ninth year, the list includes 15 nine-time honorees and 11 first-time honorees.”

Of the 132 honorees for 2015, 100 are U.S.-based companies!

Click the image to see the 2015 honorees, designated by industry as well as alphabetically.
 

 

Social Media Posts and Interaction: A HubSpot Study

28 Mar

How well do industries do in their social media engagement? Is the frequency of posting related to the level of audience participation? HubSpot recently conducted a research study on this (“2015 Social Media Benchmarks Report”). The full 49-page report may be accessed for FREE by filling out a simple form. THE RESULTS MAY SURPRISE YOU!!

As summarized by Ayaz Nanji, writing for MarketingProfs:

“Businesses that post more often to social media do not necessarily generate more engagement per post, according to a recent report from HubSpot. The report was based on HubSpot social media data for 7,000+ businesses in nine industries (real estate, healthcare, hardware, nonprofit/education, manufacturing, business/financial services, consumer goods/retail/E-commerce, marketing services, and software/technology).”

“There is no positive correlation with industries that publish more social media posts per week and interactions per post, the analysis found; in fact, there’s a very slight negative correlation. Businesses in the two industries that post the least (consumer goods/retail/E-commerce and manufacturing) have two of the highest interaction per post averages, whereas companies in the industry that posts the most (real estate) have the lowest number of interactions per post on average.”

Take a look at these three charts from HubSpot. Click them to read more at MarketingProfs.
 

 

 

 

The State of Wearable Technology

27 Mar

To date, the current popularity of wearable technology seems to be more of a company and media public relations campaign than based on actual sales revenues. In many cases, firms have not met their sales goals for the latest in wearable technology; and consumer interest is far less than expected. This is in some part due to consumers questioning whether they really need wearable technology when they have the most-advanced smartphones which are capable of doing so much.

Although some firms have succeeded with their wearable technology, Google has virtually withdrawn Google Glass from the marketplace. So, it will be interesting to see how Apple fares when it introduces its high-tech watch next month.


 
Take a look at the following infographic on wearable technology to see how far we have come in the last five-plus decades. The infographic is by Mashable.
 

 

A Fun Quiz: What Is YOUR Shopping Personality?

26 Mar

Do you like/love to shop — or hate to shop? Do you spend time comparison shopping — or buy whatever is readily available? Are you an impulse shopper drawn to sales and special displays — or a careful planner who sticks to a shopping list? Your answers to these and other questions help determine your “shopping personality.”

Inquire.net has put together a fun quiz to determine your shopping quiz. It is somewhat tongue in cheek!!

Click the image to access the quiz. You will get feedback if you complete the quiz and click “submit.”
 

 

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